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The Place of LandscapeConcepts, Contexts, Studies$
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Jeff Malpas

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262015523

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262015523.001.0001

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Framing the Landscape: The Anglo-Florentine View

Framing the Landscape: The Anglo-Florentine View

Chapter:
(p.257) 14 Framing the Landscape: The Anglo-Florentine View
Source:
The Place of Landscape
Author(s):

Katie Campbell

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262015523.003.0015

This chapter distinguishes two ways in which a place is known, as proposed by Irish poet Seamus Heaney. According to Heaney, places are either “lived, illiterate, and unconscious” or “learned, literate, and conscious.” This chapter presents the example of a collection of British and American Romantics who settled in the hills around Florence. They were initially drawn by a “learned” idea of Florence but eventually acquired a “lived” appreciation of the place. This suggests that people always approach places with preconceived ideas, especially Florence, with its title as the cradle of capitalism and republicanism. Florence’s association with empowerment, self-discovery, and rebirth makes it the quintessential example in this case.

Keywords:   place, Seamus Heaney, Florence, American Romantics, empowerment, self-discovery, rebirth

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