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Markus Krajewski

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262015899

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262015899.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

Thinking in Boxes

Thinking in Boxes

Chapter:
(p.49) 4 Thinking in Boxes
Source:
Paper Machines
Author(s):

Markus Krajewski

Peter Krapp

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262015899.003.0004

Two lines of development in the second half of the eighteenth century differentiated the previously closely related functions of librarian and scholar. One points directly to the education of professional librarians, who regard the production of indexes as an inherent part of their occupation. A second path is an aesthetic of learned production, the active discussion of principles for ordering excerpts. This chapter traces the divergence and increasing disparity of the two indexical situations. It proposes a genealogy that ranges from liberal praise for assembling excerpts (J. J. Moser), to the poetic and poetological extension of the technique (J. P. F. Richter), and to its peculiar culminating in its characteristic silence (G. W. F. Hegel).

Keywords:   librarians, scholars, indexes, excerpts, J. J. Moser, J. P. F. Richter, G. W. F. Hegel

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