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Neither Physics nor ChemistryA History of Quantum Chemistry$
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Kostas Gavroglu and Ana Simões

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262016186

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262016186.001.0001

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Quantum Chemistry qua Physics: The Promises and Deadlocks of Using First Principles

Quantum Chemistry qua Physics: The Promises and Deadlocks of Using First Principles

Chapter:
(p.8) (p.9) 1 Quantum Chemistry qua Physics: The Promises and Deadlocks of Using First Principles
Source:
Neither Physics nor Chemistry
Author(s):

Kostas Gavroglu

Ana Simões

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262016186.003.0002

This chapter outlines the history of quantum chemistry and its relation to physics and chemistry. It begins with a discussion of the nature of chemical bonds within two essentially disparate theoretical traditions—physical chemistry and molecular spectroscopy—represented by Gilbert Newton Lewis and Niels Bohr, respectively. It then looks at the 1927 paper published by Walter Heitler and Fritz London in which they demonstrated that two hydrogen atoms form a molecule and that such was not the case with two helium atoms. It also discusses group theory and problems of chemical valence, Erich Hückel’s work on nonvisualizability and the quantum theory of the double bond, the quantum theory of aromaticity, and the work of Hans Hellmann.

Keywords:   Erich Hückel, quantum chemistry, physics, chemistry, chemical bonds, Walter Heitler, Fritz London, aromaticity, hydrogen atoms, Hans Hellmann

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