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Instituting NatureAuthority, Expertise, and Power in Mexican Forests$
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Andrew S. Mathews

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262016520

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262016520.001.0001

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Working the Indigenous Industrial

Working the Indigenous Industrial

Chapter:
(p.203) 8 Working the Indigenous Industrial
Source:
Instituting Nature
Author(s):

Andrew S. Mathews

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262016520.003.0008

This chapter focuses on the impact of meetings between indigenous communities and forestry technician encounters on the federal forestry institutions’ stability. It explores the mutually beneficial relationship between forestry officials and indigenous community leaders. This chapter discusses the role of community leaders in the development of alliance between a federal bureaucracy and the indigenous community of Ixtlán. Technical incompetencies and credibility of forestry professionals are discussed. It presents reasons, including lack of technical knowledge about forests, scarce paperwork and making official knowledge as a political resource that does not let Ixtlan log its forests legally. The chapter concludes that industrial forestry in Ixtlan is the result of a collaboration of well-organized and powerful communities in making official knowledge.

Keywords:   indigenous communities, forestry technicians, federal forestry institutions, federal bureaucracy, technical knowledge, Ixtlan, legal logging

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