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Taking ScopeThe Natural Semantics of Quantifiers$
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Mark Steedman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262017077

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262017077.001.0001

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Negation and Polarity

Negation and Polarity

Chapter:
(p.175) Chapter 11 Negation and Polarity
Source:
Taking Scope
Author(s):

Mark Steedman

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262017077.003.0011

Negation gives rise to complex issues of syntactic polarity marking and directionality of monotone inference, and forces certain decisions in the semantics. Polarity is of great practical importance in computing entailment. This chapter explains how polarity-marked strings can be derived monotonically and in a single pass. It looks at examples of polarized determiners, such as the singular existential some, and considers categories for some that impose positive polarity on the raised argument. The chapter also analyzes the universal quantifier determiners every and each and their relatives, which are syntactically polarized similarly to some. Finally, it discusses indefinite determiners, the polarity of pronouns, multiple negation, negative-concord dialects of English, and negative scope and coordination.

Keywords:   polarity, entailment, polarized determiners, pronouns, negation, dialects, English, negative scope, coordination, indefinite determiners

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