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A Syntax of Substance$
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David Adger

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780262018616

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262018616.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter 1 Introduction
Source:
A Syntax of Substance
Author(s):

David Adger

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262018616.003.0001

This book proposes a syntactic system that totally separates structure building from the labeling of structure, and explores its theoretical and empirical, consequences. There are a number of possible approaches for choosing the label, but none is entirely satisfactory—all of them have problems in providing a unified labeling algorithm, especially when specifier-head structures are taken into account. The book shows that syntactic structures are always built from lexical roots via Self Merge or standard binary Merge, and argues that bound morphemes are just pronunciations of functional categories attached to roots via extended projections. It also considers the syntax of relational nominals, and provides evidence for a base-generation approach over a roll-up movement approach to the ordering and hierarchy of the constituents of the noun phrase.

Keywords:   Self Merge, syntactic structures, labeling, morphemes, syntax, relational nominals, noun phrase, lexical roots, functional categories

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