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Social PerceptionDetection and Interpretation of Animacy, Agency, and Intention$
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M.D. Rutherford and Valerie A. Kuhlmeier

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780262019279

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262019279.001.0001

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Evidence for Functional Specialization in the Human Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS)

Evidence for Functional Specialization in the Human Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS)

Consideration of Biological Motion Perception and Social Cognition

Chapter:
(p.61) 4 Evidence for Functional Specialization in the Human Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS)
Source:
Social Perception
Author(s):

Emily D. Grossman

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262019279.003.0004

The perception of human actions in point-light biological motion animations relies on the coordinated activity of brain regions in the occipital, parietal, and frontal cortex. This chapter discusses neuropsychological, single-unit, and neuroimaging evidence for linking the superior temporal sulcus (STS) to the cognitive demands of perceiving biological motion. Although the evidence accumulated over the past twenty years has suggested STS specialization for the perceptual construction of actions, the relatively recent emergence of findings from studies of social cognition suggest that a domain-specific hypothesis of STS specialization may be misplaced. Some proposals for alternatives theories are discussed.

Keywords:   Biological motion, Superior temporal sulcus, Social cognition

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