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Constructing GreenThe Social Structures of Sustainability$
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Rebecca L. Henn and Andrew J. Hoffman

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780262019415

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262019415.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 13 June 2021

Incorporating Biophilic Design through Living Walls: The Decision-Making Process

Incorporating Biophilic Design through Living Walls: The Decision-Making Process

Chapter:
(p.307) 14 Incorporating Biophilic Design through Living Walls: The Decision-Making Process
Source:
Constructing Green
Author(s):

Clayton Bartczak

Brian Dunbar

Lenora Bohren

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262019415.003.0014

For the last few thousand years, people have constructed increasingly complex structures to shield themselves from the outside world. However, this seems to have come at a price to their physical and psychological well-being. In many instances, buildings trap high concentrations of contaminants, imprisoning occupants in an atmosphere of toxins that often make them ill. This chapter looks at the process of incorporating natural elements in the built environment—a strategy referred to as biophilic design—which promotes both physical and psychological health. Why is there not widespread adoption of living walls and other biophilic technologies? What factors weight the decision to incorporate biophilic design elements—specifically living walls—into a building? Awareness of the decision-making process to incorporate biophilic design elements into buildings provides valuable insight for green technology advocates, property owners, building designers, and architects.

Keywords:   physical well-being, psychological well-being, toxins, biophilic design, physical health, psychological health, KW

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