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Lessons from the Economics of CrimeWhat Reduces Offending?$
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Philip J. Cook, Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie, and Giovanni Mastrobuoni

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780262019613

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262019613.001.0001

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Centralized versus Decentralized Police Hiring in Italy and the United States

Centralized versus Decentralized Police Hiring in Italy and the United States

Chapter:
(p.189) 9 Centralized versus Decentralized Police Hiring in Italy and the United States
Source:
Lessons from the Economics of Crime
Author(s):

Paolo Buonanno

Giovanni Mastrobuoni

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262019613.003.0010

This chapter documents striking differences in police hiring procedures between Italy and the US. In Italy police officers can only be hired through lengthy national public contests that generate sizable delays in the deployment of new police officer, while in the US the great majority of police officers are hired at the local level. We exploit these differences to look at the police-crime relationship. Italy presents some similarities but also striking differences with respect to the US. In particular, yearly changes in crime lead to larger and more immediate adjustments in police enforcement in the US than they do in Italy.

Keywords:   Police, Crime, Simultaneity, Law enforcement, Hiring procedures

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