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Distributed Morphology TodayMorphemes for Morris Halle$
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Ora Matushansky and Alec Marantz

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780262019675

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262019675.001.0001

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Agreement in Two Steps (at Least)

Agreement in Two Steps (at Least)

Chapter:
(p.167) 10 Agreement in Two Steps (at Least)
Source:
Distributed Morphology Today
Author(s):

Eulàlia Bonet

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262019675.003.0010

This chapter compares three possible analyses of DP-internal concord asymmetries, the first two having originally been designed to handle subject-verb asymmetries. The one-step analysis by Samek-Lodovici would especially run into problems with the fact that, in certain dialects of Spanish, the asymmetry is triggered by specific nouns and only in the singular. In the second proposal, a two-step process, there is full concord syntactically and, at PF, weakening rules restricted to prosodic phrases determine the final asymmetric concord. This proposal raises several questions concerning the construction of initial prosodic phrasing and encounters problems especially with the analysis of Asturian, where there is gender concord prenominally but mass concord postnominally.

Keywords:   DP-internal concord asymmetries, Samek-Lodovici, full concord syntactically, prosodic phrases, initial prosodic phrasing, Asturian

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