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Applied Ethics in Mental Health CareAn Interdisciplinary Reader$
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Dominic A. Sisti, Arthur L. Caplan, and Hila Rimon-Greenspan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780262019682

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262019682.001.0001

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Madness versus Badness: The Ethical Tension between the Recovery Movement and Forensic Psychiatry

Madness versus Badness: The Ethical Tension between the Recovery Movement and Forensic Psychiatry

Chapter:
(p.237) 17 Madness versus Badness: The Ethical Tension between the Recovery Movement and Forensic Psychiatry
Source:
Applied Ethics in Mental Health Care
Author(s):

Claire L. Pouncey

Jonathan M. Lukens

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262019682.003.0017

The mental health recovery movement promotes patient self-determination and opposes coercive psychiatric treatment. While it has made great strides towards these ends, its rhetoric impairs its political efficacy. The authors illustrate how psychiatry can share recovery values and yet appear to violate them. In certain criminal proceedings, for example, forensic psychiatrists routinely argue that persons with mental illness who have committed crimes are not full moral agents. Such arguments align with the recovery movement’s aim of providing appropriate treatment and services for people with severe mental illness, but contradict its fundamental principle of self-determination. The authors suggest that this contradiction should be addressed with some urgency, and we recommend a multidisciplinary collaborative effort involving ethics, law, psychiatry, and social policy to address this and other ethical questions that arise as the United States strives to implement recovery-oriented programs.

Keywords:   Forensic psychiatry, Recovery, Ethics, Law, Mental Health Policy

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