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Confronting the Coffee CrisisFair Trade, Sustainable Livelihoods and Ecosystems in Mexico and Central America$
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Christopher M Bacon, V. Ernesto Mendez, Stephen R Gliessman, David Goodman, and Jonathan A Fox

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262026338

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262026338.001.0001

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Coffee Agroforestry in the Aftermath of Modernization: Diversified Production and Livelihood Strategies in Post-Reform Nicaragua

Coffee Agroforestry in the Aftermath of Modernization: Diversified Production and Livelihood Strategies in Post-Reform Nicaragua

Chapter:
(p.179) 8 Coffee Agroforestry in the Aftermath of Modernization: Diversified Production and Livelihood Strategies in Post-Reform Nicaragua
Source:
Confronting the Coffee Crisis
Author(s):

Silke Mason Westphal

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262026338.003.0008

This chapter analyzes coffee agroforestry in Meseta, western Nicaragua by using household survey data from small shade-grown coffee growers of different social backgrounds, and presents information on the convergence of the shade-grown coffee system by two groups of growers. The first are the parceleros, originally known to be landless wage workers, who worked under the Sandinistas and received individual land plots; this was followed by plantations re-distribution in 1900s. The second group inherited or purchased their farms. The only catalyst common to both these groups was the collapse of agricultural modernization policies, resulting in withdrawal of rural credit and purchased inputs subsidies. The chapter concludes that adoption of shade-grown management by both these groups shows their adaptive power to respond to the changing circumstances and needs of the households.

Keywords:   shade-grown coffee, coffee agro-forestry, parceleros, Sandinistas, agricultural modernization policies, rural credit, subsidies, input subsidies

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