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Pathways to PeaceThe Transformative Power of Children and Families$
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James F. Leckman, Catherine Panter-Brick, and Rima Salah

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262027984

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262027984.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Interventions

Interventions

What Has Worked and Why?

Chapter:
(p.305) 16 Interventions
Source:
Pathways to Peace
Author(s):

Cigdem Kagitcibasi

Pia R. Britto

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262027984.003.0016

Early childhood interventions are implemented to make a difference in people’s lives, but demonstrating how they have worked is a challenge. Because many reported programs are conducted in high-income countries, results are neither representative nor balanced. This chapter reviews evidence obtained from a range of early childhood interventions designed to reduce violence and build peace, and the outcomes that were achieved in children and parents. Classic longitudinal as well as more nascent early childhood interventions are analyzed using a broad framework. These interventions focus on young children and families and are associated with peaceful outcomes at individual, family, and community levels. The mechanisms by which benefits contribute to the peaceful outcomes are unclear. However, at child and family levels, these outcomes are predictors of reduced violence and a culture of peace in adulthood. It is suggested that early experiences pave the way to positive outcomes later in life, and thus early interventions are important. Programmatic and policy-level strategies are proposed to link peacebuilding with early childhood behavior, and a call is made to improve the direct measurement of peace promotion outcomes. Published in the Strungmann Forum Reports Series.

Keywords:   early childhood interventions, violence mitigation, peacemaking, peacebuilding

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