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The Mobility of Students and the Highly SkilledImplications for Education Financing and Economic Policy$
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Marcel Gérard and Silke Uebelmesser

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780262028172

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262028172.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 15 June 2021

Financing Higher Education:

Financing Higher Education:

Mobility, Quality, and Access

Chapter:
(p.189) 7 Financing Higher Education
Source:
The Mobility of Students and the Highly Skilled
Author(s):

Nicholas Barr

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262028172.003.0007

This chapter provides an extensive theoretical discussion of an issue already raised in Chapter 6: higher education financing through income-contingent loans. It argues that loans with income-contingent repayments should make higher education free at the point of use and that this should be true as well in the presence of international mobility, despite all the obstacles.Against this background, the objectives of higher education policyare discussed and the conflict between pursuing those objectives, which means more resources for higher education, and long-term fiscal constraints is explained. Given these objectives, why is mobility desirable and should it be balanced (i.e., with roughly equal flows between countries)? Further the chapter investigates how higher education should be financed in pursuit of the objectives of improving quality, widening participation, expanding the size of the sector, and fostering student mobility, and discusses lessons from economic theory and from international experience. Finally it looks at the future, dealing with practical ways for making student loans more self-financing and considering avenues for further theoretical exploration.

Keywords:   student mobility, higher education financing, income-contingent loans, fiscal constraints, widening participation, economic theory, improving quality

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