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Out of the Shadows, Into the Streets!Transmedia Organizing and the Immigrant Rights Movement$
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Sasha Costanza-Chock

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262028202

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262028202.001.0001

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Out of the Closets, Out of the Shadows, and Into the Streets:

Out of the Closets, Out of the Shadows, and Into the Streets:

Pathways to Participation in DREAM Activist Networks

Chapter:
(p.129) 6 Out of the Closets, Out of the Shadows, and Into the Streets
Source:
Out of the Shadows, Into the Streets!
Author(s):

Sasha Costanza-Chock

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262028202.003.0007

This chapter follows the diverse paths people take as they become politicized, connect to others, and make their way into social movement worlds. The chapter explores the case of DREAMers: undocumented youth who were brought to the U.S. as young children and who are increasingly stepping to the forefront of the immigrant rights movement. The term comes from the proposed Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, which offers a streamlined path to citizenship for youth brought to the United States by their parents. Among other pathways to participation, the chapter finds that making media often builds social movement identity; in many cases, media-making projects have a long-term impact on activists’ lives. DREAM activists, often young queer people of color, have developed innovative transmedia tactics as they battle anti-immigrant forces, the political establishment, and sometimes mainstream immigrant rights nonprofit organizations in their struggle to be heard, to be taken seriously, and to win concrete policy victories at both the state and federal levels.

Keywords:   DREAM Activists, undocumented youth, undocuqueer, social movement identity, immigrant rights, media activism, lifecourse, politicization

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