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Dying in the Twenty-First CenturyToward a New Ethical Framework for the Art of Dying Well$
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Lydia M.D. Dugdale

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780262029124

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262029124.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Pluralism and the “Good” Death

Pluralism and the “Good” Death

Chapter:
(p.33) 3 Pluralism and the “Good” Death
Source:
Dying in the Twenty-First Century
Author(s):

Stephen R. Latham

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262029124.003.0003

Stephen Latham addresses the question of whether plural approaches to death are merely relative. He begins with the notion that, over time and across cultures, humans have conceived of many different types of death as “good.” He then analyzes this plurality of types of death by drawing from the German philosopher Nicolai Hartmann’s work on the hierarchy of values. The achievement of high values—such as universal love or artistic beauty—is praiseworthy. It is a great wrong to deprive a person of strong values such as those of health and life. By giving consideration to strong values but reaching for high values—even in dying—Latham shows that a good death is not simply relative.

Keywords:   Pluralism, Value theory, Nicolai Hartmann, Hierarchy of values, Good death

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