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Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases$
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Jerome O. Nriagu and Eric P. Skaar

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780262029193

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262029193.001.0001

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Impact of Metals on Immune Response and Tolerance, and Modulation of Metal Metabolism during Infection

Impact of Metals on Immune Response and Tolerance, and Modulation of Metal Metabolism during Infection

Chapter:
(p.147) 9 Impact of Metals on Immune Response and Tolerance, and Modulation of Metal Metabolism during Infection
Source:
Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases
Author(s):

Günter Weiss

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262029193.003.0009

Several metals play important roles in host cell and microbial metabolism because they form a part of central enzymes that are essential, for example, for DNA synthesis, cellular respiration, and key metabolic pathways. The availability of these metals differentially impact on host antimicrobial immune responses as well as on microbial defenses against them (Botella et al. 2012). Thus, during infection, host cells attempt to gain sufficient access to these metals or to limit the availability of these factors for microbes; this is thought to play a decisive role in the course of infections. Accordingly, subtle changes in the metabolism of these metals and their distribution throughout the body occur: microbes activate different pathways to secure a sufficient supply of these metals needed for their pathogenicity and proliferation as well as to mount effective defenses against the host immune system. This review focuses on the role of iron in the host–pathogen interplay. A brief discussion is included on the role of zinc, manganese, and copper for host–pathogen interaction, immune function, and their alteration by the inflammatory response.

Keywords:   host–pathogen interactions, immune response to metals, DNA synthesis, cellular respiration, metal availability, innate immune defenses, inflammation, nutritional immunity

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