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Disturbed ConsciousnessNew Essays on Psychopathology and Theories of Consciousness$
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Rocco J. Gennaro

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780262029346

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262029346.001.0001

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Consciousness despite Network Underconnectivity in Autism: Another Case of Consciousness without Prefrontal Activity?

Consciousness despite Network Underconnectivity in Autism: Another Case of Consciousness without Prefrontal Activity?

Chapter:
(p.249) 10 Consciousness despite Network Underconnectivity in Autism: Another Case of Consciousness without Prefrontal Activity?
Source:
Disturbed Consciousness
Author(s):

William Hirstein

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262029346.003.0010

William Hirstein argues that recent evidence points to widespread underconnectivity in autistic brains due to deviant white matter connections. Specifically, there is prefrontal-parietal underconnectivity and underconnectivity of the default mode network in autistic subjects. These phenomena along with similar data from other psychopathologies may help shed light on the current debate in the consciousness literature about whether conscious states require prefrontal and parietal/temporal connectivity. If it can be shown that people with autism (or any other psychopathology) have conscious states despite such underconnectivity, this would constitute an argument for the claim that conscious states in posterior cortex do not require associated prefrontal activity.

Keywords:   Consciousness, Autism, Brain Underconnectivity, Prefrontal cortex, Psychopathologies

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