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European Climate Leadership in QuestionPolicies toward China and India$
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Diarmuid Torney

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780262029360

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262029360.001.0001

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The Normative Gap in European, Chinese, and Indian Climate Relations

The Normative Gap in European, Chinese, and Indian Climate Relations

Chapter:
(p.73) 4 The Normative Gap in European, Chinese, and Indian Climate Relations
Source:
European Climate Leadership in Question
Author(s):

Diarmuid Torney

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262029360.003.0004

This chapter analyses the respective ways in which the EU, China, and India have framed a number of key aspects relating to the governance of climate change. The aim of doing so is to analyze the degree to which these respective normative frames converge or diverge. The extent of this divergence is characterized as a “normative gap” between the EU on the one hand, and China and India on the other. The analysis is structured around competing frames with respect to four sets of issues: (i) overall problem definition, particularly with respect to the relative importance of mitigation versus adaptation; (ii) how greenhouse gas emissions are counted, including the issues of per capita versus aggregate accounting, production versus consumption accounting, and historical responsibility; (iii) the related issues of equity and differentiation; and (iv) the choice of policy instruments and governance architectures for climate change mitigation, including the relative importance of market and non-market mechanisms. Overall, there has been some convergence but also a good deal of divergence with respect to the respective ways in which the EU, China, and India have framed key aspects of the global governance of climate change. This normative gap has strongly shaped the development of EU engagement with China and India on climate change.

Keywords:   European Union, China, India, Climate change, UNFCCC, Normative gap, Emissions accounting

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