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Division III of Heidegger's Being and TimeThe Unanswered Question of Being$
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Lee Braver

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780262029681

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262029681.001.0001

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The Place of Division III in Heidegger’s Plan for Being and Time: Part One as Discovering a “Clue” and Part Two as Giving the Answer

The Place of Division III in Heidegger’s Plan for Being and Time: Part One as Discovering a “Clue” and Part Two as Giving the Answer

Chapter:
(p.105) 5 The Place of Division III in Heidegger’s Plan for Being and Time: Part One as Discovering a “Clue” and Part Two as Giving the Answer
Source:
Division III of Heidegger's Being and Time
Author(s):

Charles Guignon

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262029681.003.0005

Instead of trying to guess what Heidegger would have said had he completed Being and Time, I clarify the role of the missing Division by making explicit what Heidegger actually says about his vision for the undertaking as a whole, especially as stated in the second introduction. I claim that it is Part Two’s historical destruction that would have answered the question of the meaning of being, whereas the goal of Part One’s transcendental inquiry was only to indicate time as the clue for it. Finally, I use Contributions to Philosophy to suggest that the reason for Heidegger’s dissatisfaction with his project lies in the very attempt to offer a correct interpretation at all, since such a project already biases the possible answers one can get.

Keywords:   Being and Time, Heidegger, Time, Meaning, Being, Subjectivity, Metaphysics, History, Contributions to Philosophy

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