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Women and Information TechnologyResearch on Underrepresentation$
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Joanne Cohoon and William Aspray

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780262033459

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262033459.001.0001

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Traversing the Undergraduate Curriculum in Computer Science: Where Do Students Stumble?

Traversing the Undergraduate Curriculum in Computer Science: Where Do Students Stumble?

Chapter:
(p.350) (p.351) 12 Traversing the Undergraduate Curriculum in Computer Science: Where Do Students Stumble?
Source:
Women and Information Technology
Author(s):

Sandra Katz

John Aronis

Christine Wilson

David Allbritton

Mary Lou Soffa

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262033459.003.0012

The underrepresentation of females among computer science Bachelor of Science degree recipients is attributed to two main forces: (i) fewer women than men enroll in computer science programs at the undergraduate level; and (ii) attrition, i.e., more women than men leave these programs. This chapter focuses on the attrition aspect. It demonstrates the strong impact of performance on both student persistence in an undergraduate program and the gender gap in persistence. Performance alone does not explain this gap; rather, it is performance at an expected level that is the important factor, and women appear to be more negatively affected than men when their achieved grades do not measure up to their desired grades.

Keywords:   college students, female students, attrition, computer science programs

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