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Theorizing Digital Cultural HeritageA Critical Discourse$
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Fiona Cameron and Sarah Kenderdine

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780262033534

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262033534.001.0001

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Speaking in Rama: Panoramic Vision in Cultural Heritage Visualization

Speaking in Rama: Panoramic Vision in Cultural Heritage Visualization

Chapter:
(p.300) (p.301) 15 Speaking in Rama: Panoramic Vision in Cultural Heritage Visualization
Source:
Theorizing Digital Cultural Heritage
Author(s):

Sarah Kenderdine

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262033534.003.0016

This chapter examines the chronological use of the panorama in order to decode its sociocultural implications and its visualization of cultural heritage. It traces the panoramic scheme “in transition” to reach an applied virtual heritage, and highlights the provocative tension that exists for virtual heritage as a tool for scientific and cultural visualization, the gap between the scientific requirement to reproduce rational material reality and those “sensations” created by the illusion inherent to panoramic immersion. The chapter first explores panoramas in a historic context and their connection to photography and cinemagraphy before turning to the limits of panoramic illusion. It then discusses the decline of the panorama, panorama and virtual travel, giddiness and horizon, the panoramic vision, the so-called Electronic Baroque, the politics of illusion, virtual reality panoramas, the panoramic “photo bubble,” the navigation of virtual space, and panoramic capture technologies.

Keywords:   Electronic Baroque, politics, illusion, virtual reality, panorama, cultural heritage, virtual heritage, visualization, virtual space, photo bubble

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