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Theorizing Digital Cultural HeritageA Critical Discourse$
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Fiona Cameron and Sarah Kenderdine

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780262033534

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262033534.001.0001

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Te Ahua Hiko: Digital Cultural Heritage and Indigenous Objects, People, and Environments

Te Ahua Hiko: Digital Cultural Heritage and Indigenous Objects, People, and Environments

Chapter:
(p.76) (p.77) 4 Te Ahua Hiko: Digital Cultural Heritage and Indigenous Objects, People, and Environments
Source:
Theorizing Digital Cultural Heritage
Author(s):

Deidre Brown

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262033534.003.0005

This chapter examines the potential uses of three-dimensional augmented and virtual reality in managing, researching, and sustaining indigenous collections. Focusing on indigenous Maori treasures, bodies, and landscapes of New Zealand, it demonstrates how digital media, while generally the product of First World ideologies, offer non-Western people the opportunity to challenge the authority of such structures and reinterpret the way in which cultural arts, artifacts, practices, and environments are managed and presented. In particular, the chapter considers how augmented and virtual reality offer tremendous opportunities for indigenous peoples to recover and record their cultural heritage. After discussing the role of technology in cultural development, it considers the experience from bicultural pilot projects involving the collaboration of museum professionals, curators, academics, Maori participants, and software and hardware industries. The chapter also explores the replicant as well as cultural values in relation to legal and moral protections.

Keywords:   Maori, New Zealand, augmented reality, virtual reality, digital media, indigenous peoples, cultural heritage, replicant

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