Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Environmental Justice in Latin AmericaProblems, Promise, and Practice$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David V. Carruthers

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262033725

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262033725.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 28 February 2021

Popular Protest and Unpopular Policies: State Restructuring, Resource Conflict, and Social Justice in Bolivia

Popular Protest and Unpopular Policies: State Restructuring, Resource Conflict, and Social Justice in Bolivia

Chapter:
(p.238) (p.239) 10 Popular Protest and Unpopular Policies: State Restructuring, Resource Conflict, and Social Justice in Bolivia
Source:
Environmental Justice in Latin America
Author(s):

Tom Perreault

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262033725.003.0011

This chapter focuses on protests against unequal policies of controlling and allocating natural resources in Bolivia. These protests have surfaced through social movements against policies, which result in unequal distribution of water and natural gas resources. Corrupt governments and authorities have failed to bring natural resources under a central authority. Much of the country’s rural and urban water resources have been controlled by local groups, and many transnational groups and agencies are engaged in developing and managing its portable water and irrigation systems. Resource governance in Bolivia will be unable to achieve the same level of success as the North Atlantic states due to the impact of these factors. Unstable economic and political conditions in the country have also rendered legal and institutional frameworks incapable of governing and managing natural resources efficiently.

Keywords:   natural resources, central authority, Bolivia, portable water, institutional frameworks

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.