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Environmental Justice in Latin AmericaProblems, Promise, and Practice$
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David V. Carruthers

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262033725

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262033725.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Waste Practices and Politics: The Case of Oaxaca, Mexico

Waste Practices and Politics: The Case of Oaxaca, Mexico

Chapter:
(p.118) (p.119) 5 Waste Practices and Politics: The Case of Oaxaca, Mexico
Source:
Environmental Justice in Latin America
Author(s):

Sarah A. Moore

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262033725.003.0006

This chapter, which examines the relationship between waste-management practices and political movement through the case study of Oaxaca, Mexico, discusses the historical relationships between urban development, cleanliness, and prevailing waste-management practices in Oaxaca. It also describes public opinion about the city’s waste-management practices and their impact on its cleanliness. The city implemented these practices in 1985 with a cleanliness initiative called ”Una Ciudad Limpia es una Ciudad Bonita,” which meant “a clean city is a beautiful city.” They have been implemented to address the major problem of garbage handling in the city. State and city administrations continue to focus on garbage collection while failing to implement more effective disposal strategies.

Keywords:   waste management, Oaxaca, Mexico, urban development, garbage handling

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