Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Disclosing the WorldOn the Phenomenology of Language$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Andrew Inkpin

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780262033916

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262033916.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

The Art and Science of Indirect Sense

The Art and Science of Indirect Sense

Chapter:
(p.119) 5 The Art and Science of Indirect Sense
Source:
Disclosing the World
Author(s):

Andrew Inkpin

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262033916.003.0006

This chapter shows how Merleau-Ponty’s notion of indirect sense contributes to understanding the disclosive function of linguistic signs within the Heideggerian framework and explicates the notion of presentational sense. It focuses first on Merleau-Ponty’s appropriation of Saussure’s conception of signs to clarify the structure and preconceptual intelligibility of indirect sense. It then considers Merleau-Ponty’s use of modern painting as an analogy, which highlights the importance of embodiment in providing an innovative model for the presentational (‘pointing out’) function of linguistic signs and the intelligence involved in embodied deliberation. Having clarified how these accounts complement each other as descriptions of prepredicative intelligence, as characterized in chapter 2, the chapter concludes by showing how they fill out and improve Heidegger’s view of the disclosive function of linguistic signs in a phenomenologically convincing way.

Keywords:   Merleau-Ponty, disclosive function, embodiment, indirect sense, Saussure, painting, prepredicative, presentational sense, Heideggerian framework

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.