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Between Preservation and ExploitationTransnational Advocacy Networks and Conservation in Developing Countries$
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Kemi Fuentes-George

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780262034289

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262034289.001.0001

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Conclusion: Grounding Global Conservation in Local Norms

Conclusion: Grounding Global Conservation in Local Norms

Chapter:
(p.199) 6 Conclusion: Grounding Global Conservation in Local Norms
Source:
Between Preservation and Exploitation
Author(s):

Kemi Fuentes-George

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262034289.003.0006

The conclusion finds that a comparative study of transnational activism underlines the importance of justice claims to global environmental governance. It links debates on international environmental justice with literature on environmental regime effectiveness and neoliberal ecological economics. When networks generated a consensus, socialized with policymakers and invoked norms consonant with local justice, they were more likely to persuade policymakers. Absent one or more of the variables, conservation projects were implemented poorly, or simply rejected by states. Therefore, issues of fairness or justice go to the heart of effective management. They reflect the important normative questions behind biodiversity management, including what biodiversity consists of, what it is being managed for, and for whom it is being conserved.

Keywords:   Regime effectiveness, Neoliberal, Justice, Environmental governance, Transnational activism, Biodiversity, Norms

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