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The Pragmatic TurnToward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science$
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Andreas K. Engel, Karl J. Friston, and Danica Kragic

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780262034326

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262034326.001.0001

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Action-Oriented Models of Cognitive Processing

Action-Oriented Models of Cognitive Processing

A Little Less Cogitation, A Little More Action Please

Chapter:
(p.159) 10 Action-Oriented Models of Cognitive Processing
Source:
The Pragmatic Turn
Author(s):

James Kilner

Bernhard Hommel

Moshe Bar

Lawrence W. Barsalou

Karl J. Friston

Jürgen Jost

Alexander Maye

Thomas Metzinger

Friedemann Pulvermüller

Marti Sánchez-Fibla

John K. Tsotsos

Gabriella Vigliocco

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262034326.003.0010

This chapter considers action-oriented processing from a model-oriented standpoint. Possible relationships between action and cognition are reviewed in abstract or conceptual terms. We then turn to models of their interrelationships and role in mediating cognitively enriched behaviors. Examples of theories or models inspired by the action-oriented paradigm are briefly surveyed, with a particular focus on ideomotor theory and how it has developed over the past century. Formal versions of these theories are introduced, drawing on formulations in systems biology, information theory, and dynamical systems theory. An attempt is made to integrate these perspectives under the enactivist version of the Bayesian brain; namely, active inference. Implications of this formalism and, more generally, of action-oriented views of cognition are discussed and open issues that may be usefully pursued from a formal perspective are highlighted.

Keywords:   Strüngmann Forum Reports, action, active inference, enactivism, ideomotor theory, information theory, Bayesian brain

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