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The Pragmatic TurnToward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science$
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Andreas K. Engel, Karl J. Friston, and Danica Kragic

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780262034326

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262034326.001.0001

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Prediction, Agency, and Body Ownership

Prediction, Agency, and Body Ownership

Chapter:
(p.109) 7 Prediction, Agency, and Body Ownership
Source:
The Pragmatic Turn
Author(s):

Jakob Hohwy

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262034326.003.0007

The idea that the brain is an organ for prediction error minimization is becoming increasingly influential. Since this idea posits action as playing a central role, it has the potential to reveal new perspectives on troubled notions of action, sense of agency, and body ownership. Elucidating these notions may help ascertain how close this new framework is to contemporary views of embodied, enactive, and extended cognition, which also places action central to cognition. The prediction error minimization framework suggests novel and somewhat provocative notions of action, sense of agency, and bodily ownership and, in important respects, it pulls in the opposite direction from the embodied, extended, and enactive approaches.

Keywords:   Strüngmann Forum Reports, agency, action, body ownership, embodied cognition, enactivism, extended cognition, prediction error minimization

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