Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Statistical Approaches to Gene X Environment Interactions for Complex Phenotypes$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Windle

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780262034685

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262034685.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Introduction and Overview of Statistical Approaches to Gene × Environment Interactions for Complex Phenotypes

Introduction and Overview of Statistical Approaches to Gene × Environment Interactions for Complex Phenotypes

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction and Overview of Statistical Approaches to Gene × Environment Interactions for Complex Phenotypes
Source:
Statistical Approaches to Gene X Environment Interactions for Complex Phenotypes
Author(s):

Michael Windle

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262034685.003.0001

This chapter provides an introduction and overview of important issues that served as motivations for this book. For many complex phenotypes (e.g., depression, diabetes, obesity, substance use), there is substantial evidence that while genetic influences are important, so are environmental influences; moreover, there is substantial evidence from both behavior genetic studies (e.g., twin and adoptee studies) and molecular genetic studies (both human and infrahuman) that genes commonly interact with environmental factors in predicting complex phenotypes. The fields of genomics and other –omics (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics) provide exciting opportunities to advance science and foster the goals of public health and a more individualized intervention approach (e.g., precision medicine). The goals of these more individualized approaches would benefit greatly not only by advances in genomics and other –omics, but also by incorporating information both on environments and their interactions with genomic and other biological material and regulatory processes (e.g., environmental signal to biological pathway responses). Such findings would thereby offer more flexible guidance to a broader range of prevention, intervention, and treatment targets, and facilitate more tailored programs based on a fuller complement of G and E influences.

Keywords:   Complex phenotypes, missing heritability, multi-locus effects

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.