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Giving a DamnEssays in Dialogue with John Haugeland$
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Zed Adams and Jacob Browning

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035248

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035248.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Being Minded

Being Minded

Chapter:
(p.187) 6 Being Minded
Source:
Giving a Damn
Author(s):

Danielle Macbeth

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035248.003.0007

As generally understood, the world of our everyday experience is an appearance due in part to impacts on us of such things as wavelengths of light or moving particles and in part to contingent features of our sense organs and brains. A central theme in Haugeland’s work is that this picture is profoundly misguided, that we need to recover something more like the ancient Aristotelian conception of ourselves as rational animals. It appears, then, that we are faced with a choice between the ancient Aristotelian conception of our mindedness and the modern Cartesian conception, more exactly, a naturalized version of it. But Haugeland’s account of our mindedness is not merely pre-modern. It is, as I argue, recognizably “post-modern” in incorporating insights of both the pre-modern Aristotelian conception and that of early modernity.

Keywords:   John Haugeland, Aristotelian life form, Naturalized Cartesian dualism, Intelligible unity, Constituted unity, Worldly meaning, Mediated immediacy

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