Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Computational PsychiatryNew Perspectives on Mental Illness$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

A. David Redish and Joshua A. Gordon

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035422

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035422.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 24 July 2021

There Are No Killer Apps but Connecting Neural Activity to Behavior through Computation Is Still a Good Idea

There Are No Killer Apps but Connecting Neural Activity to Behavior through Computation Is Still a Good Idea

Chapter:
(p.247) 13 There Are No Killer Apps but Connecting Neural Activity to Behavior through Computation Is Still a Good Idea
Source:
Computational Psychiatry
Author(s):

P. Read Montague

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035422.003.0013

The quest to understand the relationship between neural activity and behavior has been ongoing for well over a hundred years. Although research based on the stimulus-and-response approach to behavior, advocated by behaviorists, flourished during the last century, this view does not, by design, account for unobservable variables (e.g., mental states). Putting aside this approach, modern cognitive science, cognitive neuroscience, neuroeconomics, and behavioral economics have sought to explain this connection computationally. One major hurdle lies in the fact that we lack even a simple model of cognitive function. This chapter sketches an application that connects neuromodulator function to decision making and the valuation that underlies it. The nature of this hypothesized connection offers a fruitful platform to understand some of the informational aspects of dopamine function in the brain and how it exposes many different ways of understanding motivated choice.

Keywords:   Strüngmann Forum Report, reinforcement learning, prediction learning, temporal difference, reward prediction error, dopamine, octopamine, hypervaluation disease

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.