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Extraordinary Science and PsychiatryResponses to the Crisis in Mental Health Research$
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Jeffrey Poland and Serife Tekin

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035484

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035484.001.0001

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Classification, Rating Scales, and Promoting User-Led Research

Classification, Rating Scales, and Promoting User-Led Research

Chapter:
(p.197) 9 Classification, Rating Scales, and Promoting User-Led Research
Source:
Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry
Author(s):

Rachel Cooper

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035484.003.0009

Psychiatric research currently faces multiple crises; one is that trust in reported research findings has been eroded. Concerns that much research serves the interests of industry rather than the interests of patients have become mainstream. Such worries are not unique to psychiatry, but extend to many areas of science. One way in which such concerns can be ameliorated is via the development of more amateur/ citizen/ user-led research. I argue that promoting research conducted outside of traditional academic settings promises a range of benefits – both to the non-traditional researchers themselves and to others who want truths to be discovered. Having argued that it would be a good idea to have more user-produced research, I discuss how research by users might be facilitated or hindered by changes to the informational infrastructure of science. In particular, I discuss how different styles of classification, and rating scale, can facilitate the work of some research communities and set-back the work of others.

Keywords:   amateur science, user-led research, citizen science, classification, rating scale, natural history, industry bias, trust

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