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Governing through GoalsSustainable Development Goals as Governance Innovation$
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Norichika Kanie and Frank Biermann

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035620

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035620.001.0001

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The Sustainable Development Goals and Multilateral Agreements

The Sustainable Development Goals and Multilateral Agreements

Chapter:
(p.241) 10 The Sustainable Development Goals and Multilateral Agreements
Source:
Governing through Goals
Author(s):

Arild Underdal

Rakhyun E. Kim

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035620.003.0010

This chapter explores goal setting, as exemplified by the Sustainable Development Goals, as a governance strategy for reforming or rearranging existing international agreements and organizations so as to enhance their overall performance in promoting sustainable development. It discusses the political and entrepreneurial challenges peculiar to bringing existing international institutions into line, and identifies the conditions under which goal setting could be an effective tool for orchestration. The chapter concludes that, because of their ecumenical diversity and soft priorities, the Sustainable Development Goals are not likely to serve as effective instruments for fostering convergence. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides neither an overarching norm that can serve as a platform for more specific goals nor an integrating vision of what long-term sustainable development in the Anthropocene means. In the absence of such an overarching principle and vision, the impact of the Sustainable Development Goals on global governance will likely materialize primarily as spurring some further clustering of existing regimes and organizations within crowded policy domains. The Sustainable Development Goals cannot be expected to generate major architectural reforms that will significantly reduce the fragmentation of the global governance system at large.

Keywords:   Orchestration, Fragmentation, Integration, Coordination, interlinkages

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