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Joan Costa-Font and Mario Macis

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035651

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035651.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

The Role of Children in Building Parents’ Social Networks

The Role of Children in Building Parents’ Social Networks

Chapter:
(p.283) 13 The Role of Children in Building Parents’ Social Networks
Source:
Social Economics
Author(s):

Odelia Heizler

Ayal Kimhi

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035651.003.0013

This paper analyzes the effect of children on the parent's social networks using Israeli Social Survey data for 2002-2006. Additional demographic attributes of the household, such as the age gap between the oldest and youngest child and the age of the youngest child are also examined. We found that the first child decreases social networking of both males and females. The number of children has a U-shaped effect on parents' involvement in social networks, with substantial differences between fathers and mothers. The negative effect is dominant on the mothers’ involvement in social networks, while the positive effect is dominant on the father's involvement in social networks. The age gap between children has a positive effect on both parents’ involvement in social networks, while the age of the youngest child has a positive effect only on the father's involvement in social networks.

Keywords:   Social Networks, Family Composition, Children, Israeli Social Survey, Age gap

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