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Philosophy, Technology, and the Environment$
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David M. Kaplan

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035668

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035668.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Philosophy, Technology, and the Environment
Author(s):

David M. Kaplan

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035668.003.0001

Environmental philosophy and philosophy of technology have a lot in common. Both fields explore the positive and negative aspects of human modifications of the world. Both question the limits of technology in relation to natural environments, animals, plants, and food. Both examine if human making and doing is compatible with nature or wholly different from it. And both examine the difference between what is considered to be natural and artificial. Technology and the environment further intersect in a number of issues, such as climate change, sustainability, geo-engineering, and agriculture. The reason for the overlap is fundamental: Environmental issues inevitably involve technology, and technologies inevitably have environmental impacts. Technology and the environment are like two sides of the same coin: Each is fully understood only in relation to the other. Yet, despite the ample overlap of questions concerning technology and the environment, the two philosophical fields have developed in relative isolation from each other. Even when philosophers in each field address themselves to similar concerns, the research tends to be parallel rather than intersecting, and the literatures remain foreign to one another. These divergent paths are unfortunate. Philosophers from each field have a lot to contribute to the other....

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