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TraversalsThe Use of Preservation for Early Electronic Writing$
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Stuart Moulthrop and Dene Grigar

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035972

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035972.001.0001

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Monsters and Freaks: Patchwork Girl and the New Unreadable

Monsters and Freaks: Patchwork Girl and the New Unreadable

Chapter:
(p.167) 4 Monsters and Freaks: Patchwork Girl and the New Unreadable
Source:
Traversals
Author(s):

Stuart Moulthrop

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035972.003.0005

This chapter is informed by Shelley Jackson’s author traversal of her hypertext fiction, Patchwork Girl, and her subsequent interview. Jackson’s re-working of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has been well explored, but less has been said of the second influence-text for Patchwork Girl, L. Frank Baum’s Patchwork Girl of Oz. Resonances from that text suggest a radically different way of valuing difference and rebellion, under the sign of the “freak” instead of the “monster.” The chapter relates this difference to structural aspects of the hypertext exposed in Jackson’s traversal and interview, particularly the fragmentary and elliptical part of the design called “Broken Accents.”

Keywords:   Shelley Jackson, Patchwork Girl, Hypertext fiction, Frankenstein, Oz, “Broken Accents”

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