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Demographic Change and Long-Run Development$
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Matteo Cervellati and Uwe Sunde

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262036627

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262036627.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 24 October 2019

Land Inequality, Education, and Marriage: Empirical Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia

Land Inequality, Education, and Marriage: Empirical Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia

Chapter:
(p.183) 8 Land Inequality, Education, and Marriage: Empirical Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia
Source:
Demographic Change and Long-Run Development
Author(s):

Francesco Cinnirella

Erik Hornung

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262036627.003.0008

This chapter offers an account of how institutional factors affect marriage, fertility, and education decisions. It reveals that higher landownership concentration was associated with lower enrollment rates as well as a negative relationship between marriage and enrollment rates, which suggests that political and economic inequality might be an important cofactor of the demographic and economic transitions. According to the study, the initial existence (or formation)of an economic elite will lead to the concentration of political power in the hands of few, which will in turn lead to the introduction of political institutions designed to sustain inequality. Such societies fail to adopt redistributive policies that allow for an optimal investment in physical and human capital. Therefore, in the long run, elite-based societies will not develop institutions conducive to sustainable economic growth.

Keywords:   marriage, fertility, education, landownership, economic inequality, elite-based societies, political power, economic growth

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