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Robot SexSocial and Ethical Implications$
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John Danaher and Neil McArthur

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262036689

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262036689.001.0001

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Should We Campaign Against Sex Robots?

Should We Campaign Against Sex Robots?

Chapter:
(p.47) 4 Should We Campaign Against Sex Robots?
Source:
Robot Sex
Author(s):

John Danaher

Brian Earp

Anders Sandberg

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262036689.003.0004

In September 2015 a well-publicised Campaign Against Sex Robots (CASR) was launched. Modelled on the longer-standing Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, the CASR opposes the development of sex robots on the grounds that the technology is being developed with a particular model of female-male relations (the prostitute-john model) in mind, and that this will prove harmful in various ways. In this chapter, we consider carefully the merits of campaigning against such a technology. We make three main arguments. First, we argue that the particular claims advanced by the CASR are unpersuasive, partly due to a lack of clarity about the campaign’s aims and partly due to substantive defects in the main ethical objections put forward by campaign’s founder(s). Second, we argue that it would be very difficult to endorse a general campaign against sex robots unless one embraced a highly conservative attitude towards the ethics of sex, which is likely to be unpalatable to those who are active in the campaign. In making this argument we draw upon lessons from the campaign against killer robots. Finally, we conclude by suggesting that although a generalised campaign against sex robots is unwarranted, there are legitimate concerns that one can raise about the development of sex robots.

Keywords:   Sex Robots, Killer Robots, Autonomous Weapons, Sex Work, Prostitution, Ethics of Technology, Campaign Against Sex Robots

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