Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Robot SexSocial and Ethical Implications$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John Danaher and Neil McArthur

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262036689

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262036689.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Was It Good for You Too? The New Natural Law Theory and the Paradoxical Good of Sexbots

Was It Good for You Too? The New Natural Law Theory and the Paradoxical Good of Sexbots

Chapter:
(p.173) 10 Was It Good for You Too? The New Natural Law Theory and the Paradoxical Good of Sexbots
Source:
Robot Sex
Author(s):

Joshua D. Goldstein

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262036689.003.0010

We normally think of the so-called new natural law theory (NNLT) for its as a relentlessly conservative sexual ethic, one which argues both for the rightness only of “reproductive-type” sex (and that only within a different-sex marriage) as well as the moral impossibility of masturbation, sex outside of marriage, and sex of a non-reproductive-type. On the face of it, the human intent behind the creation of sexbots, let alone with the act of having sex with them, would seem to be wrong on all these counts. However, this chapter argues that matters are not so simple. NNLT can reveal the intrinsic moral importance of sexbots. If sexbots and human each are beings capable of choosing and remaining committed to complete friendship, and of loving, then the embodied union that we do achieve will not be morally objectionable even according to NNLT properly understood.

Keywords:   New Natural Law Theory, John Finnis, Christian Sexual Ethics, Natural Law

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.