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Governing Global Electronic NetworksInternational Perspectives on Policy and Power$
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William J. Drake and Ernest J. Wilson III

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262042512

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262042512.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2019

Conclusion: Governance of Global Electronic Networks: The Contrasting Views of Dominant and Nondominant Actors

Conclusion: Governance of Global Electronic Networks: The Contrasting Views of Dominant and Nondominant Actors

Chapter:
(p.583) 16 Conclusion: Governance of Global Electronic Networks: The Contrasting Views of Dominant and Nondominant Actors
Source:
Governing Global Electronic Networks
Author(s):

Ernest J. Wilson

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262042512.003.0447

This chapter examines whether the United States has a consensus that differs from the preferences of non-dominant actors, whether the current global governance mechanisms for information and communications technology (ICT) are working well or broken, how the current arrangements on global governance of electronic networks affect non-dominant actors, and what scholars and researchers can do to help practitioners in the field of ICTs. The chapter first considers the so-called barriers to entry in ICT before turning to the priorities of the “rest of the world” (developing countries and transitional economies). It then discusses the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) as a site of contestation over global ICT governance, private sector self-governance, and market powers.

Keywords:   global governance, United States, non-dominant actors, information and communications technology, electronic networks, barriers to entry, rest of the world, developing countries, World Summit on the Information Society, private sector

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