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Natural ExperimentsEcosystem-Based Management and the Environment$
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Judith A. Layzer

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262122986

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262122986.001.0001

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Restoring South Florida’s River of Grass

Restoring South Florida’s River of Grass

Chapter:
(p.103) 5 Restoring South Florida’s River of Grass
Source:
Natural Experiments
Author(s):

Judith A. Layzer

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262122986.003.0005

This chapter sheds light on the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), which promises to protect and restore the world’s largest freshwater marsh Everglades in South Florida. The CERP, which is an aquatic-system ecosystem-based management experiment, is believed to be the largest ecosystem restoration project ever attempted. It has attracted a hefty sum of money from federal, state, and local sources. The state of Florida has acquired more than 200,000 acres of land from the fund generated for the plan. The Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District are two primary agencies that have the responsibility of implementing the CERP. However, the plan seems to be ineffective in terms of restoring a healthy, resilient Everglades’ ecosystem, as it maintains a heavily engineered and intensively managed approach and poses a risk of failure on the natural system.

Keywords:   Comprehensive Everglades Restoration, Everglades, South Florida, ecosystem restoration, land, funds

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