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Food and the Mid-Level FarmRenewing an Agriculture of the Middle$
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Thomas A. Lyson, G. W. Stevenson, and Rick Welsh

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262122993

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262122993.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 30 June 2022

Is Relationship Marketing an Alternative to the Corporatization of Organics? A Case Study of OFARM

Is Relationship Marketing an Alternative to the Corporatization of Organics? A Case Study of OFARM

Chapter:
(p.55) 4 Is Relationship Marketing an Alternative to the Corporatization of Organics? A Case Study of OFARM
Source:
Food and the Mid-Level Farm
Author(s):

Amy Guptill

Rick Welsh

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262122993.003.0004

This chapter investigates the functioning and structure of the Organic Farmers’ Association for Relationship Marketing (OFARM) to assess the benefits of its business models for organic commodity producers. The basic questions of the case study include OFARM’s goals, challenges, and successes, along with its role in providing an organizational model for the agriculture-of-the-middle regeneration. The chapter discusses the use of conventionalization by the agricultural industry as an excuse to cover up the real reasons for the limited role of the field crop growers in value chains development. Similarities between OFARM and industrial agglomerations, including knowledge sharing, regionalization, and flexibility, are discussed; along with differences, including a focus on innovations by industrial agglomerations. The chapter emphasizes market power in democratic terms by OFARM.

Keywords:   OFARM, organic commodity producers, agriculture, field crop growers, industrial agglomerations

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