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Conflicts of Conscience in Health CareAn Institutional Compromise$
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Holly Fernandez Lynch

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262123051

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262123051.001.0001

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Which Institution? Licensing Boards Bearing the Burdens of Conscience and Access

Which Institution? Licensing Boards Bearing the Burdens of Conscience and Access

Chapter:
(p.99) 4 Which Institution? Licensing Boards Bearing the Burdens of Conscience and Access
Source:
Conflicts of Conscience in Health Care
Author(s):

Holly Fernandez Lynch

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262123051.003.0030

This chapter explains some important lessons from the sort of institutional solutions in place in both the pharmacy and end-of-life contexts that aim to preserve the autonomy of all interested individuals. An institutional body can develop more potential matches for patients and decrease the inconvenience posed by any individual physician’s conscientious refusal. The chapter shows that it is better for an institution such as a hospital or pharmacy to have to violate its conscience than for individuals to have to directly perform the objectionable act, and suggests that licensing boards protect both conscientious refusers and patients.

Keywords:   institutional solutions, autonomy, pharmacy, hospital, conscience, licensing boards, conscientious refusal

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