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Fighting TrafficThe Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City$
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Peter D. Norton

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262141000

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262141000.001.0001

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Blood, Grief, and Anger

Blood, Grief, and Anger

Chapter:
(p.21) 1 Blood, Grief, and Anger
Source:
Fighting Traffic
Author(s):

Peter D. Norton

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262141000.003.0002

This chapter chronicles the numbers of motor vehicle accidents in the United States during the early years of the motor car and looks at how this affected safety regulations for motorists. With over 200,000 people killed in accidents in the 1920s, automobiles were seen as a menace. Several campaigns were launched in order to increase public safety, and conferences such as the First Cooperative Safety Congress—which evolved into the National Safety Council—were held in order to address these issues. One particular individual noted to have played a major role in promoting public safety was Charles Price. The chapter illustrates the anger that America experienced over traffic safety.

Keywords:   motor vehicle accidents, public safety, First Cooperative Safety Congress, National Safety Council, Charles Price, traffic safety

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