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Working-Class Network SocietyCommunication Technology and the Information Have-Less in Urban China$
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Jack Linchuan Qiu

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262170062

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262170062.001.0001

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Reflections

Reflections

Chapter:
(p.231) 8 Reflections
Source:
Working-Class Network Society
Author(s):

Jack Linchuan Qiu

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262170062.003.0128

This chapter presents a summary on the main lessons set out in this book. It specifically reflects on the complex role of working-class information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the resilience and vulnerability of translocal networks among the have-less in a larger historical and transnational context. Working-class connectivity helps have-less urbanites in seeking education and better job opportunities, leading to the enhancement of their overall life chances. The rise of network labor, and of working-class network society at large, offers rare openings for equality, justice, and democracy. It is noted that the complexity and volatility of the city underneath in China are reflected by and incorporated into the development of digital media.

Keywords:   working-class ICTs, translocal networks, have-less, working-class connectivity, education, network labor, network society, China

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