Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Incentives and Choice in Health Care$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Frank A. Sloan and Hirschel Kasper

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262195775

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262195775.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

What We Know and Don’t Know about the Effects of Cost Sharing on the Demand for Medical Care—and So What?

What We Know and Don’t Know about the Effects of Cost Sharing on the Demand for Medical Care—and So What?

Chapter:
(p.84) (p.85) 4 What We Know and Don’t Know about the Effects of Cost Sharing on the Demand for Medical Care—and So What?
Source:
Incentives and Choice in Health Care
Author(s):

Joseph P. Newhouse

Anna D. Sinaiko

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262195775.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the effects of cost sharing on the demand for medical care based on the results of the Rand Health Insurance Experiment (HIE) conducted in the 1970s and 1980s to investigate price elasticities of demand for various types of personal health services for families with different income levels, as well as for children and adults, and the impact of health insurance coverage on health outcomes. The chapter first analyzes the traditional view of cost sharing in health economics before turning to empirical evidence on the effects of cost sharing on the demand for medical care.

Keywords:   cost sharing, demand, medical care, Rand Health Insurance Experiment, price elasticities, personal health services, families, health insurance, health outcomes, health economics

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.