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The Nature of LoveCourtly and Romantic$
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Irving Singer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262512732

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262512732.001.0001

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Troubadour Fin’ Amors

Troubadour Fin’ Amors

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 Troubadour Fin’ Amors
Source:
The Nature of Love
Author(s):

Irving Singer

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262512732.003.0003

This chapter discusses the antagonism between courtly love and mystical love; the former is limited to human beings and fosters sexual desire, while the latter is a love directed toward God that aims to eliminate all but the spiritual. In this respect, mystical love renounces courtly love as it symbolizes worldly attitudes that are deemed heretical. At the same time, these two concepts reveal their Platonic parenthood through their similarities. It is the same case with the troubadour concept of “fin’ amors,” which fuses the Neoplatonism of the Middle East with elements of Christian mysticism, resulting in an idealization of human love. The seeds of courtly love may be found in Plato’s Symposium, as most aspects of the eros tradition, upon which courtly love is dependent, are rooted in that work.

Keywords:   courtly love, mystical love, worldly attitudes, Platonic parenthood, fin’ amors, Neoplatonism, Middle East, Christian mysticism, human love, eros tradition

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