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The Nature of LoveCourtly and Romantic$
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Irving Singer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262512732

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262512732.001.0001

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The Courtliness of Andreas Capellanus

The Courtliness of Andreas Capellanus

Chapter:
(p.59) 3 The Courtliness of Andreas Capellanus
Source:
The Nature of Love
Author(s):

Irving Singer

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262512732.003.0004

This chapter Andreas Capellanus’s Tractatus amoris & de amoris remedio, which is considered the one great text on courtly love. The Tractatus amoris, which was written around 1185 and condemned by the bishop of Paris almost a hundred years later, is divided into three books: the first, concerned with the nature of love and its acquisition; the second, with the retention of love; and the third, with love’s rejection and elimination. The third book has raised controversy since it concludes the work by condemning the very ideas Capellanus himself expounded upon in the previous books, and scholars have offered differing explanations on the subject. Although courtly love originated from the discursive poetry of the troubadours of Provence, only in its northern version does French courtly love receive a doctrinal formulation.

Keywords:   Andreas Capellanus, courtly love, Tractatus amoris, bishop of Paris, discursive poetry, troubadours of Provence

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