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What Is Addiction?$
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Don Ross, Harold Kincaid, David Spurrett, and Peter Collins

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262513111

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262513111.001.0001

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Neural Recruitment during Self-Control of Smoking: A Pilot fMRI Study

Neural Recruitment during Self-Control of Smoking: A Pilot fMRI Study

Chapter:
(p.268) (p.269) 10 Neural Recruitment during Self-Control of Smoking: A Pilot fMRI Study
Source:
What Is Addiction?
Author(s):

John R. Monterosso

Traci Mann

Andrew Ward

George Ainslie

Jennifer Bramen

Arthur Brody

Edythe D. London

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262513111.003.0011

This chapter reports pilot data from a neuroimaging study that recorded changes in functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) signal while overnight abstinent cigarette smokers were given opportunities to smoke, but were asked to try to resist the temptation to do so, and shows the link between performance on inhibitory tasks and activation of the frontal lobes. It also suggests that inhibitory control tasks tap functions that are relevant to voluntary control of drug taking. The reported study presents an initial step toward understanding the dynamics of control of attention, and looks at how future research efforts in this area can profit from looking at the connection between brain function and actual behavior during attempts at smoking cessation.

Keywords:   functional magnetic resonance, neuroimaging study, cigarette, smoking cessation, brain function, frontal lobes

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